Summer Carpet Trends: Custom Outdoor Carpets and Rugs

Give your outdoor space the ultimate in comfort and luxury!

Outdoor-area-rugs-decorSo you measured your room for new carpet, your professional measured your space for new carpets and you have high quality carpeting left over from when you carpeted your home.  What to do with it?

 

The greatest news of all time is you can use remnant carpeting…now. No not when your over zealous best friend spills a glass of pinot in your living room to patch the stain, but your carpet doesn't have to be stored the rafters of your garage either!

The hottest trend for the last couple years has come to a boiling point in summer 2015.  Luxury outdoor carpets are all the rage.  No longer for foyers and indoor wood floors, homeowners and decorators are taking having high quality carpets custom bound and are rolling out the welcome mat for their summer guests in style!

Ever sat out on your deck or patio late at night and felt the desire to slip off your sandals and put your feet up with that late night drink but the slate or pavers were just too cool (or hot mid-day) to consider that?  This seasons hottest trend is taking a little more of the indoors out.  Give your outdoor space the ultimate in luxury, by binding a section of your remnant carpet and creating a super stylish (and coordinated) rug for your out door living space.

While many families toss out carpeting remnants, there are a many ways that these valuable pieces may be used. Most newly carpeted spaces have at least one bit of carpet remnant sizable enough to be used either inside or outside of the house as a rug. This blog is a simple tutorial on how you (if you are the DIY type OR the not so DIY type) can bind the unfinished edges to make a coordinated rug last as long as the rest of your home's new carpeting.

First up DIY Tape Binding – recommended for smaller mat type projects unless you have help or are really dedicated to long term projects.

 

Carpet Binding Supplies You’ll need to bind your carpet by hand:

⁃    Sturdy Sheers
⁃    Thimble
⁃    Carpet needle (available at most fabric stores)
⁃    Thread – There are literally thousands of colors of carpet binding thread available in natural (jute, cotton or wool) and manmade (polyester) fibers.
⁃    Carpet Binding Tape – again just like the carpet binding threads there are seemingly endless options here.

Step 1 — Trim the Frayed Edges

Use the shears to carefully trim off any frayed edges of the carpet. This should help to eliminate any of the parts of the edging that are already coming undone or which may be more prone to damage later on. Do not trim into the carpet itself or cut into any part of the carpet which is still viable.

Step 2 — Thread the Needle

Wear the thimble to protect yourself from injury. Carefully thread the end of the thread through the eye of the upholstery or carpet needle. Many people opt to use jute or a thicker type of thread to help bind the binding to the edge of the carpet more securely. It's up to you; decide which type of thread looks to be the best to match with the color of your carpet.

Step 3 — Cut the Binding

Lay the binding out next to the carpet, then use the shears to cut it so that it has about two extra inches on the side. This will help to ensure that there's enough room for the binding to fold over the edge of the carpet so that you can attach it securely.

Step 4 — Fold the Binding

Fold the part of the binding that hangs over the edge of the carpet over the edge. Double check it at every foot or so to be sure that it's even on both the top and bottom of the carpet. Flatten the binding out to create a crease to make it easier to sew.

Step 5 — Sew the Binding Into Place

Use a cross stitch to sew the binding into place over the carpet. Be sure that the needle goes through the entire carpet and both sides of the binding in order to ensure that it is held together properly. The binding should be sewed from the bottom of the carpet all the way to the top, where you can tie off the thread with a large knot.

 

 

No Binding Tape (Blanket Stitch Carpet Binding) Method

 

Hand Stitch (no binding tape) Carpet Binding Supplies You’ll need:

⁃    Thimble
⁃    Carpet needle (available at most fabric stores)
⁃    Thread – There are literally thousands of colors of carpet binding thread available in natural (jute, cotton or wool) and manmade (polyester) fibers.
⁃    *optional Matching carpet fringe

Hand stitching around the entire edge using a close blanket stitch is a second option, one that allows for a bit more embellishment, including the attachment of fringe just like you see on expensive oriental rugs.
A blanket stitch is a simple stitch and the backing of the carpet remnant will make spacing easy for keeping your stitches even.

Step 1 — Trim the Frayed Edges

Use the shears to carefully trim off any frayed edges of the carpet. This should help to eliminate any of the parts of the edging that are already coming undone or which may be more prone to damage later on. Do not trim into the carpet itself or cut into any part of the carpet which is still viable.

Step 2 — Thread the Needle

Wear the thimble to protect yourself from injury. Carefully thread the end of the thread through the eye of the upholstery or carpet needle. Many people opt to use jute or a thicker type of thread to help bind the binding to the edge of the carpet more securely. It's up to you; decide which type of thread looks to be the best to match with the color of your carpet.

Step 3 — Start your blanket stitch

blanket-stitch_original Fig. 1

1. Thread your needle and stitch from the back of the carpet to the front somewhere secure around the outer edge of the carpet, but far enough down that this first stitch will remain secure.

2. Moving left to right, move your needle right one stitch space (just as wide as your yarn) and towards the center of your rug. This should only be as far in as you want your completed bound edge to be. If you want a 1 inch wide edge, make your stitch one inch towards the center.

3. This is the only time for the remainder of the project that you will stitch in the outter edge of the carpet, this is again just to anchor your stitch.  You will come out in a straight line from your inner (#2) stitch up through the carpet (back to front) and bring the needle to the front of the thread locking the stitch in place creating a straight line (also called a locking stitch more specifically a blanket stitch)

 

Fig. 2 & 3 the remainder of your stitches for the length of your yarn will follow Fig 1 Step 2 & 3 with the exception of coming up behind and not through the carpet on the up stitch. You'll want to keep a tight uniform stitch.  You may even use a straight edge and marker to follow a straight line.  When you reach the end of your yarn, you'll want to do Fig. 1 Step one for two or three stitches

hand-bound-rugThen you'll repeat this process for the entire edge of your project.   Keeping a consistent length and tension on your stitching will ensure an edge similar to the image to the right.

 

Alternately, if you're unable, or unwilling, to sew, you can purchase a type of binding tape that is designed to be adhered to the carpet with glue. These tend to not be quite as stable or sturdy as the standard types of binding tape, however, provide a quick clean and easy to apply method that will provide a seasonal rug with a nice edge.

If you are not the DIY type and want to make a quality rug out of your carpet remnant there are companies that will professionally bind your carpets for a nominal fee.  To find a carpet binder in your area you may contact one of Bloomsburg's Carpet Dealers or Agents to find a professional who is local to you and familiar with quality carpets.

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